Re-humanising a chronic hoarder

When you have too much clutter around you it creates a somewhat stagnant and negative vibration, and of course this also invades your body and drags you down both physically and spiritually. This will have a negative effect on your life, lowering your energy, making you mentally more sluggish, which in turn impairs your decision making process. This will lead you to feel that you are stuck in a rut, and that your life is leading nowhere.

So, if and when you make the decision to clear away the clutter, it will literally turn not only your life around, but it will also drastically improve your immediate environment, and all of the slow, ponderous, stuck energy is at once banished to be replaced with a feeling of vibrancy. For you personally, you will feel invigorated, and you will get a feeling of positive purpose back into your life.

When you allow clutter to build up, it makes your life so much more difficult, so naturally, when you begin to de-clutter, you will therefore be making your life more simple at the same time. You can begin once again to concentrate on the things that you enjoy doing, and you will discover that your health takes a turn for the better because of all of the positive energy that is being generated, and the enjoyment that is back in your life.

Although de-cluttering sounds a simple thing to do in theory, when it comes down to practice, it is not at all simple. What you have to realize is that hoarding is no ordinary “fad”, or character default; it is actually a mental disorder. Chronic hoarding is an OCD, an Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. It is not something that people want to do as a natural impulse; rather it is something that they feel compelled to do, even though in their heart of hearts, they understand that it is not a desirable quality.

The truth of the matter is in the name. It is compulsive. It transcends the normality of everyday life. But without professional help, it is unlikely that a manic hoarder will ever be able to be cured of this particular syndrome. To “normal” people it is impossible to understand. You can perceive that it is a compulsion; an obsession; but precisely because you are normal, you cannot understand how you can allow yourself to get into the situations that hoarders find themselves in, indeed create, for themselves.

Hoarding is a symptom of insecurity. The urge to hoard stems from a belief that you have to have something in order to survive. For example you may feel compelled to hoard something specific; something that you feel you cannot be without. It may be certain articles or products; it may be certain information pertaining to certain subjects. In the worst case scenario, it is a general compulsion to hoard almost anything and everything.

Re-humanising a chronic hoarder

Serious hoarding will lead to one’s dwelling environment being totally overtaken by the clutter that is associated with hoarding. The ordinary living environment ceases to be; instead of being a place to live in, it becomes primarily a place to store the clutter, and the basic everyday needs of basic life, become secondary. In worst case instances, kitchens cease to be kitchens, and bathrooms and toilets become storage areas. The squalor that can be caused is unbelievable.

It is however, a controllable syndrome. A complete cure may never be forthcoming, but with professional help it is possible to be able to manage the compulsion. There are a number of professionals who specialize in this particular area, be they psychiatrists, or behavioural experts. They can be found online, and their experience and knowledge is an essential ingredient to formulating a management treatment.

If you have friends or family members who are stricken with this syndrome, you can search online for appropriate help to: (a) help to instigate a care/management program, and (b): to find appropriate trained people to help to discard the clutter itself is a “humane” way as far as a hoarder is concerned.