House Clearance Wirral – Reduse Reuse Recycle Updates

Northern House Clearance undertake house clearance in all areas of Wirral – Meols Leasow Oxton Pensby Thingwall Prenton Rock Ferry Seacombe Upton Wallasey Thingwall Prenton Rock Ferry Seacombe Upton Wallasey West Kirby Thurstaston.

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Fibre fuel plant opens in Slough

A revolutionary plant which manufactures fuel from material which would otherwise be sent to landfill was officially opened on 21st March by the Environment Minister Earl Ferrers. The new Fibre Fuel facility in Slough processes fibrous waste generated by local businesses into a fuel cube which is used as a replacement for coal in Slough Heat and Power’s fluidised bed power generation plant. The new plant also separates paper, board and plastics suitable for recycling from the deliveries so that only waste and not recyclable material is processed into Fibre Fuel. The new Fibre Fuel facility was welcomed by Earl Ferrers who commented: ‘ This is an exciting initiative that is going to help meet Government objectives as well as the needs of the local community by providing a safe and sustainable waste disposal method as well as a useful source of fuel which helps conserve our finite fossil fuel resources.’ Another benefit from Berkshire County Councils’ viewpoint is that this new plant will help them meet their recycling targets. The Fibre Fuel project is a joint venture between Slough Heat and Power, the subsidiary utilities company of Slough Estates plc and UK Waste Management. It is the first of is type outside the USA and will process and recycle some 65,000 tonnes of material per annum. The partners are also investigating the possibilities of opening more.

New recycling plant opens in Scotland

UK Waste has opened a new £2 million recycling plant in Granton, Edinburgh. This new facility is designed to process 100,000 tonnes of commercial and industrial waste each year in order to recover paper, board, plastics, wood and metal for reuse. UK Waste’s Managing Director Ian Wakelin said that this new plant had been opened in response to their customers asking for more than just waste collection and disposal to landfill. He also commented: ‘This new Materials Recovery Facility will recover around a quarter of the waste that will go through it, reducing the need for landfill, providing secondary raw materials to processors and saving our customers money by avoidance of the landfill tax being introduced later this year.’ He added, ‘It is the first of many which we are opening throughout the UK and I am particularly pleased that we have established it in Scotland where many observers have been sceptical about the future growth of recycling. If ever proof were required that recycling will happen – it is now here.’

High risk of failure for waste companies

Somewhat depressing news from CCN Group; they estimate that the danger of companies in the waste disposal industry failing in the next twelve months is higher than at the end of the last recession. They calculate that over a third of all companies in this sector have a one in three chance of going bust during 1996. David Coates, Managing Director of CCN Business Information stated: ‘We believe that the root cause of the increase in the risk of company failure has been a fundamental shift in the demographic make-up of companies in the UK. This has been well documented and reflects the legacy of the Thatcher years. House Clearance Wirral noted companies have rationalised and ‘down-sized’ considerably over the last few years, often by selling parts of their business to their managements, thus creating more small businesses. Many people who lost their jobs have set up new businesses, adding to the increase in smaller businesses which are intrinsically higher risk. These new, smaller owner-managed businesses carry a disproportionate risk.’