House Clearance Kirkcaldy – Recycling Recommendations

We undertake house clearance in all areas of Kirkcaldy : Dunfermline Kirkcaldy Glenrothes Saint Andrews Buckhaven Rosyth Cowdenbeath Leven Cupar Lochgelly Kelty Burntisland Ballingry Inverkeithing Kennoway Cardenden Newport-on-Tay Oakley Tayport Anstruther High Valleyfield.

How Does Northern House Clearance Services Work?

  • The first step is to CALL US ON 07966 311 536 for prices/quote.
  • We will ask you a few simple questions in order to understand your situation.
  • We usually just require 24 hours notice. We like to turn up at 9am on the day of our appointment and stay until the house clearance is complete.
  • Once we have removed all of the furniture, junk & rubbish from the house we will issue you with an invoice for your records.
  • We ALWAYS keep household items to one side which we know can be either re-used or donated free to charity. Our house clearance charges are fair & we do NOT add 20% VAT on the final price.

A Full List Of Our Kirkcaldy House Clearing Services

House clearances can be potentially stressful & troublesome if you use cowboy companies – Please look at our many House Clearance Recommendations

House Clearance Kirkcaldy – Recycling Recommendations

A report on a kerbside recycling cost survey has recentley been completed. The trials were carried out in Kirkcaldy by the staff at Northern House Clearance Kirkcaldy and were done to establish the cost per household for the kerbside collection and recycling of selected household waste in Kirkcaldy.

Some recycling companies in Fife claim that door-to door recycling collections can be carried out for less than 3 pence a household per week. However, this claim has been strongly criticised by staff at house clearance Kirkcaldy. Who calculated that the actual costs incurred by the scheme cited are actually £7.14 per household per year, rather then the 81p that the recycling companies in Fife claim.

House Clearance Kirkcaldy said: ‘The original Fife recycling figure includes projected savings from expanding the recycling service throughout Scotland, projected landfill tax savings, and most questionably, indirect savings from the way in which Fifes refuse collection service is operated.’ Also suggested that the reason the costs have been presented so favourably is due to the new producer responsibility obligation for packaging waste.

House Clearance Kirkcaldy staff used their experience in recycling at one of the most successful recycling boroughs of Kirkcaldy to analyse the recycling company claims. As the recycling manager for House Clearance Kirkcaldy saw the Government target of 25% recycling for household waste achieved by the end of 2014, which by anyone’s standards gives him the right to comment on the real costs involved in such schemes.

House Clearance Kirkcaldy believes that the recycling company figures have to be challenged: for one thing the sorting costs at the waste centres in Fife have not been taken into consideration, although the recycling companies claim that this will become self-financing as throughputs increase. House Clearance Kirkcaldy also challenged the claim that Fifes combined refuse and recycling collection system can be operated without any extra crew compared to the number used for refuse collections only.

As extra work is involved to collect the recyclables separate from the refuse, this would seem to indicate that the refuse crews are doing all the extra work for no additional cost. This would only be possible if the efficiency of Fifes refuse collections has been improved, and this is not directly connected to the recycling service because their refuse collection is contracted out. As House Clearance Kirkcaldy points out: ‘Would other contractors feel able to tender for refuse collection contracts with and without a Fife style recycling service at the additional cost quoted by Fife?’

House Clearance Kirkcaldy offers our own interpretation of the true costs of the Fife scheme: the cost of the recycling element of the combined refuse and recycling collections in Fife come out at £4.57 per year, added to the sorting costs which come to 47p per household per year to make a grand total of £5.14 per household per year. The City of Edinburgh recycling costs, for a scheme which offers a far wider range of materials recycling with a higher diversion rate, come to a slightly higher figure of £6.18 per household per year for the period 2012-2013. Not bad for recycling rate of over 25%.