House Clearance Hull – Writing A Will Advice

We undertake house clearance in all areas of Kingston upon Hull: Anlaby Common Anlaby Park Gipsyville The Avenues Dunswell Orchard Park Greenwood Bransholme Kingswood Sutton-on-Hull Wawne Garden Village Ings Longhill Sutton-on-Hull Drypool Victoria Dock Marfleet Preston Road Greatfield Bilton Grange Anlaby Kirk Ella West Ella Willerby Bilton Hedon Patrington Preston Hessle.

How Does Northern House Clearance Services Work?

  • The first step is to CALL US ON 07966 311 536 for prices/quote.
  • We will ask you a few simple questions in order to understand your situation.
  • We usually just require 24 hours notice. We like to turn up at 9am on the day of our appointment and stay until the house clearance is complete.
  • Once we have removed all of the furniture, junk & rubbish from the house we will issue you with an invoice for your records.
  • We ALWAYS keep household items to one side which we know can be either re-used or donated free to charity. Our house clearance charges are fair & we do NOT add 20% VAT on the final price.

A Full List Of Our Kingston upon Hull House Clearing Services

House clearances can be potentially stressful & troublesome if you use cowboy companies – Please look at our many House Clearance Recommendations

Writing A Will

A will is a legal document which lets you decide what happens to your property and possessions after your death. Although not required by law, it is the best way to ensure that your estate is passed on to family and friends exactly according to your terms. Otherwise, your assets may be distributed according to the law rather that your wishes.

The importance of writing a will

House Clearance Hull gives several good reasons to prepare a will in case of death:

You can decide how your assets are going to be shared – if you don’t leave a will, the law dictates who gets what If you’re an unmarried couple or in civil partnership (same-sex or not), you can insure that your partner will be provided for In case of a divorce, you can decide whether to leave anything for your former partner

You can insure that your beneficiaries don’t have to pay more Inheritance Tax than necessary If you have children, you may need to make arrangements in case either or both parents die

Preparing your will

While it is possible to write a will yourself, it is advisable to recruit the services of a professional solicitor as there are various legal formalities that have to be followed to make sure that your will is valid. You may also need legal advice for some of the more complicated legal matters. Your solicitor can also advise you on Inheritance Tax Matters.

A solicitor should be able to visit you in your home, care home or hospital. The fees for writing a will, depend on the complexity of your affairs and the experience level of your solicitor.

If you prefer to write the will yourself, you can get advice from voluntary organisations such as:

Citizens Advice Bureau
Age UK

What to include in you will

Before contacting solicitors or writing the will, you may want to think about what you want to be included in your will. House Clearance Hull reccomends you consider to include:

The amount money, property or possessions you may have
Who you want to benefit from your will. Who will be the guardian of any children under 18 years of age. You can contribute a gift to your favourite charity, if you wish to do so. Who your executor will be (i.e. the person who will look after your affairs after your death)

You can appoint your executor by naming them in the will, otherwise the courts can appoint other people to be responsible for this job.

Keeping your will safe

Once you have prepared a will, you should place it in a safe location and notify your executor, relative or close friend about its location. If the will is prepared by a solicitor, they will normally keep the original and send you a copy. You can request the original document if you wish to hold it.

Updating your will

House Clearance Hull advise you review and update your will every five years or so. You should also update it after any major event in your life – getting married, getting divorced or separated, having children or buying a new house. All changes should be done by ‘codicil’ (a document that amends or supplements the previous will) or by making a new will from scratch.

Writing a will in Scotland

The Scottish law on inheritance varies from the one in England. If you live in Scotland it’s best to get in touch with a solicitor or a voluntary organisation such as Age Scotland or the Citizens Advice Bureau.