House Clearance Clackmannanshire Skip Permits Information

We undertake house clearance in all areas of Clackmannanshire: Alloa Alva Clackmannan Coalsnaughton Devonside Dollar Dollarfield Fishcross Forest Mill Forestmill Fossoway Inglewood Kennet Lower Mains Lower Ninnis Menstrie Pool of Muckhart Sauchie Solsgirth Tillicoultry Tullibody Yetts o Muckhart.

How Does Northern House Clearance Services Work?

  • The first step is to CALL US ON 07966 311 536 for prices/quote.
  • We will ask you a few simple questions in order to understand your situation.
  • We usually just require 24 hours notice. We like to turn up at 9am on the day of our appointment and stay until the house clearance is complete.
  • Once we have removed all of the furniture, junk & rubbish from the house we will issue you with an invoice for your records.
  • We ALWAYS keep household items to one side which we know can be either re-used or donated free to charity. Our house clearance charges are fair & we do NOT add 20% VAT on the final price.

A Full List Of Our Clackmannanshire House Clearing Services

House clearances can be potentially stressful & troublesome if you use cowboy companies – Please look at our many House Clearance Recommendations

House Clearance Clackmannanshire Skip Permits Information

House Clearance Clackmannanshire can report skip operators have faced increased costs since recent rules gave local authorities the power to charge for skip permits. Such permits are necessary when skips are placed on roads and pavements, for example when hired by householders and builders typically for building rubble etc.

Alan Jones from House Clearance Clackmannanshire warns that some councils are charging in excess of £13 per skip per week for skips, which is a significant amount when you consider that the average skip hire operation may expect to make only £10 per skip per week profit anyway.

Inevitably the higher costs will have to be passed on to the customer. Local Authority  (Transport) Charges 1998, gave councils the power to enforce charges in these circumstances, and in addition the amount charged is at the discretion of the authority based on administration costs. Alan Jones argues that councils should not be able to make a profit from these permits. The question of who should pay the charge is another issue raised. When the skip is being used during a house clearance who should foot the bill: the skip operator, the householder or the house clearer? If a council prosecutes for non-compliance, they will most probably pick on the skip owner.

The owner of the skip as defined by the council may well depend on the hire agreement. One council has indicated that in the case of a skip hired for building rubble for more than one month, the ‘owner’ is the person hiring the skip, rather than the skip operator. What the situation is in other circumstances remains to be seen. Skip operators may well start issuing two-tiered price lists depending on site access and the local council’s charges, which vary regionally. As House Clearance Clackmannanshire points out, this will penalise poorer householders, as they are less likely to own houses with drives and thus need to keep skips on the road. He suggests that in effect these regulations are ‘The Terraced Property Tax’.